h1n1-8 Tips to Help Your Staff Avoid the Flu

This is part 3 of our series on the h1n1 flu and how to keep it from disrupting your business (Small Business-Are You Ready for h1n1?h1n1-1o Tips for Small Business)  We turn again to the web site flu.gov for 8 tips for individual workers to avoid the flu.  You might want to print it out, go over it with your staff, and post it where everyone can see it.

  1. Stay home if you’re sick.
  2. Wash your hands frequently.
  3. Avoid touching your nose, mouth, and eyes.
  4. Cover your coughs and sneezes with a tissue, or cough and sneeze into your upper sleeve.  (This could be problematical for employees who wear sleeveless tops.)
  5. Wash your hands or use an alcohol-based hand cleaner after coughing, sneezing, or blowing your nose.
  6. Keep frequently touched common surfaces clean.  For example, telephones, computer equipment, etc.  (If you operate a business where customers visit, the same goes for surfaces that they touch.)
  7. Try not to use other workers’ phones, desks, offices, or other work tools and equipment.
  8. Maintain a healthy lifestyle.

As an employer you can encourage a healthy working environment by providing plenty of hand cleaner and disinfectant wipes for your employees use.  Your good example will also encourage them and show that you care about their health (and your own.)

Small Business-Are You Ready for H1N1?

Unless you’ve  been living in a cave for the last few months, you’ve surely heard of H1N1, or swine flu.  The disease is spreading rapidly in areas of the world which are already into “flu season” and there’s no reason to expect that the United States and Europe will be any different.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have put together an excellent web site with information on the disease which includes tips on how to stay healthy.  According to the CDC, the disease hits young people the hardest so old guys like me are less likely to get sick, but I wouldn’t count on that.

Here’s the thing.  As a small business owner, you’re business could be at risk if key employees get sick, especially for an extended period. Have you given any thought to what you’ll do if that happens?

The web site Flu.com offers a flu toolkit for business.  I’ve added a link to the site in the right column.  The site strongly suggests that every business should have a plan in place for dealing with H1N1 and other illnesses.  Some key points:

  • Examine your policies for sick leave and working from home.
  • Identify essential employees, essential business functions, and other critical inputs.
  • Share your plan with employees.  [I would suggest that it might be even better to get them involved in preparing the plan.]
  • Prepare a business contingency plan.
  • Establish an emergency communications plan.

Keep in mind that key suppliers and business partners may not be available in the event of a serious outbreak.

As a small business, especially in difficult economic times like these, having a plan to minimize the effects of a possible interruption of your operations could be the best investment you’ll make this year.

More tomorrow.