Salesmanship Part 1

andy rooneyI hate to sound like Andy Rooney here, but have you ever noticed….how few people try to sell you anything anymore? I’m not talking time share pitchmen, or vacation club scam artists (more on that later), I’m talking about the person behind the counter at the retail store or anywhere else where you may need help making a purchase.  You’d think that in a tough economy people would be doing their best to convince you to part with some of your money.

I have two stories to tell you along these lines; one today and the other tomorrow.  Today’s story involves Dave Sinclair, a St. Louis auto retailing institution.  He’s famous for his television commercials, featuring just Dave standing behind a somewhat hokey-looking podium that has his logo on it.  No flash, no gimicks, just Dave talking to you about his latest deals.  Click on the link to meet Dave (somewhat) in person.  Sinclair is in his 80s and must have gone straight from the maternity hospital to the car dealership. or so it seems.  Dave is a blue-collar guy selling blue-collar cars to blue-collar customers.

Lately a lot of his TV spots have centered on the fact that he sells GM and Ford products exclusively.  No foreign-made cars at Dave Sinclair.  He encourages his viewers to buy from him, of course, but if not, “then buy American from somebody.” But, that’s not today’s story.

The story is that Dave’s business is good and he’s hiring…..and that he’s getting few takers.  He prefers to hire older workers (baby boomers) who know what hard work is and aren”t afraid of it.  In his usual straight-ahead approach, he told a local TV reporter “I’m not paying people to stand around.  I”m paying them to sell cars.”

In a world where the first question from a lot of job applicants is “How much vacation do I get?” his approach obviously makes a lot of people nervous.  It’s not touchy-fealy, or politically correct.  But it’s brutally honest, and that’s something that’s sorely missing today.  Personally I’d rather work for someone who’s upfront with me than someone who smiles all the time while he’s planning to stab you  in the back.

I believe it’s Sinclair’s honest approach that’s kept him in the car business for longer than most of his customers have been alive.  Good luck, Dave.  I hope you find the folks you need to keep the legacy alive.