h1n1-8 Tips to Help Your Staff Avoid the Flu

This is part 3 of our series on the h1n1 flu and how to keep it from disrupting your business (Small Business-Are You Ready for h1n1?h1n1-1o Tips for Small Business)  We turn again to the web site flu.gov for 8 tips for individual workers to avoid the flu.  You might want to print it out, go over it with your staff, and post it where everyone can see it.

  1. Stay home if you’re sick.
  2. Wash your hands frequently.
  3. Avoid touching your nose, mouth, and eyes.
  4. Cover your coughs and sneezes with a tissue, or cough and sneeze into your upper sleeve.  (This could be problematical for employees who wear sleeveless tops.)
  5. Wash your hands or use an alcohol-based hand cleaner after coughing, sneezing, or blowing your nose.
  6. Keep frequently touched common surfaces clean.  For example, telephones, computer equipment, etc.  (If you operate a business where customers visit, the same goes for surfaces that they touch.)
  7. Try not to use other workers’ phones, desks, offices, or other work tools and equipment.
  8. Maintain a healthy lifestyle.

As an employer you can encourage a healthy working environment by providing plenty of hand cleaner and disinfectant wipes for your employees use.  Your good example will also encourage them and show that you care about their health (and your own.)

h1n1-10 Tips for Small Business

Yesterday I pointed you to the Flu.gov, a web site with tips for businesses to deal with a possible flu pandemic.   (Small Business-Are You Ready for H1N1?)  As I was writing the post, my daughter walked through the room complaining of flu-like symptoms.   I told her she should probably stay home from school, both to help her to recuperate, and to keep from spreading from spreading whatever she has to other students.  Unfortunately she had a mid-term exam that she couldn’t miss.  Maybe her school should read Mining the Store.

In case you missed it, or haven’t had time to look it over, here are the sites ten tips for staying healthy.

  1. Develop policies that encourage workers (students?) to stay home.
  2. Develop other flexible policies to telework (if feasible)
  3. Provide resources and a work environment that promotes personal hygiene.
  4. Provide educational and training materials.  See www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/business.
  5. Instruct employees who are well but have an ill family at home with the flu that they can go to work as usual.
  6. Encourage workers to obtain a seasonal influenza vaccine.
  7. Encourage employees to get the 2009 H1N1 vaccine when it becomes available.
  8. Provide workers with up-to-date information on influenza risk factors.
  9. Plan to implement practices to minimize face-to-face contact between workers if advised by the local health department.
  10. If an employee becomes sick at work, separate them from other workers until they can be sent home.

Regarding 6 and 7, you might consider paying for the vaccinations and giving your staff time off to get them.

It may be impossible to keep everyone on your staff from getting sick, especially if the flu becomes the pandemic that some predict.  But, whatever you can do to minimize their risk (and that includes your risk, too) is cheap insurance from a potentially serious business interruption.

Tomorrow:  8 Tips for Individuals

Small Business-Are You Ready for H1N1?

Unless you’ve  been living in a cave for the last few months, you’ve surely heard of H1N1, or swine flu.  The disease is spreading rapidly in areas of the world which are already into “flu season” and there’s no reason to expect that the United States and Europe will be any different.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have put together an excellent web site with information on the disease which includes tips on how to stay healthy.  According to the CDC, the disease hits young people the hardest so old guys like me are less likely to get sick, but I wouldn’t count on that.

Here’s the thing.  As a small business owner, you’re business could be at risk if key employees get sick, especially for an extended period. Have you given any thought to what you’ll do if that happens?

The web site Flu.com offers a flu toolkit for business.  I’ve added a link to the site in the right column.  The site strongly suggests that every business should have a plan in place for dealing with H1N1 and other illnesses.  Some key points:

  • Examine your policies for sick leave and working from home.
  • Identify essential employees, essential business functions, and other critical inputs.
  • Share your plan with employees.  [I would suggest that it might be even better to get them involved in preparing the plan.]
  • Prepare a business contingency plan.
  • Establish an emergency communications plan.

Keep in mind that key suppliers and business partners may not be available in the event of a serious outbreak.

As a small business, especially in difficult economic times like these, having a plan to minimize the effects of a possible interruption of your operations could be the best investment you’ll make this year.

More tomorrow.

Another Virus!

Just last month we were all concerned about a virus that might attack our computers. The April 1 date has come and gone but according to the experts we’re not out of the woods yet.

Now we’re being warned about a different type of virus. This time the target isn’t our computer, it’s us. We’re being warned about a potential “pandemic” of swine flu. “Pandemic” is a good example of an obscure term that can suddenly become a buzzword, seemingly overnight.

Obviously this is no laughing matter.  Like the conficker computer virus, swine flu may be an overblown threat. But since this one has killed people, it’s certainly worth our attention. Since it spreads by human contact, and since most of us are in the business of human contact, we should be careful.

There are a number of precautions that you can take and that’s beyond the scope of this blog. Check out the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention web site for more information. But at the very minimum, you should wash your hands frequently and make sure the things you touch often are squeeky clean. Cash registers, phones, counters, door knobs and handles, display merchandise, and any number of other surfaces should be kept clean with a disinfectant cleaner.

Waterless hand cleaner, can literally be a life saver. Make sure you have some at every work station and that you and your staff use it.

When in doubt, it’s always best to err on the side of caution.